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Australia’s Backyard – 5 Places You Must See | Greyhound

Australia’s Backyard – 5 Places You Must See


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Australia is one of the world’s most popular destinations for overseas travellers seeking equal servings of adventure and leisure. Tourists are treated to a buffet of sights, attractions and natural wonders that we locals often overlook or take for granted. Here are some spectacular Australian destinations you absolutely must see.

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Kakadu National Park

Kakadu National Park

Kakadu is Australia’s largest terrestrial national park. The world heritage listed park covers over 20 000 square km and is home to a range of rare and endemic plants and animals. Visitors can enjoy world class hikes and nature walks or simply lay back and bask in beauty of awe-inspiring waterfalls, crystal pools and rock formations, and yet how many of us have actually been there? Kakadu is located about 240 kilometres east of Darwin in the Northern Territory and stretches from northern coastlines and estuaries through floodplains, billabongs and lowlands to southern rocky ridges and stone country. It’s best appreciated from June to August when hot days couple with cool nights to give you equal time for adventures and bush fire banter.

Uluru

Uluru

If you live in Australia and you’re not familiar with Uluru you’ve probably been living under a pretty big rock, maybe even the world’s biggest rock! Uluru is essentially a 3.5 km rock that sits just west of the Simpson Desert in the Northern Territory about 460 km south west from Alice Springs. The rock stands just under 350 metres high, but the bulk it is covered underground - 2.5 km deep. Thousands of tourists visit this natural giant and the surrounding area every year, but very few Australians can say they’ve seen it with their own eyes. It’s a shame really because Uluru is more than 600 million years old and is sacred to indigenous Australians. Uluru is particularly beautiful in Spring when the wildflowers bloom and mild temperatures make exploring that little bit easier.

Great Barrier Reef

Great Barrier Reef Turtle

The Great Barrier Reef is made up of over 2900 reefs and 900 islands, it’s the world’s largest coral reef and is even visible from the moon, but can you describe what it looks like? The reef stretches nearly 2300 km from Papua New Guinea along the Queensland Coast to Bundaberg and is home to a near incomprehensible array of marine life. Surprisingly few Australians have personally enjoyed the Great Barrier Reef and if dredging in the area continues, they might not ever get a chance to. This would be a shame because it’s roughly 18 million years of nature’s finest work on display. The Great Barrier provides year round enjoyment but is particularly beautiful in whale season from May to September and all through the warmer months. Tourists can view the reef from various destinations along the northern coast of Queensland.

The Great Ocean Road

The Great Ocean Road

The Great Ocean Road runs for 243 km along the Victorian coastline from Torquay to Allansford. It was built by returned soldiers after WWI in honour of their fallen comrades, making it the worlds longest war memorial. This beautiful stretch of road bends around cliff faces and winds through rainforests putting some of Australia’s best natural wonders and coastal towns on display. Towns along the stretch including Apollo Bay and Lorne attract thousands of international tourists every year but few Australians outside Victoria have driven along the iconic road. The Victorian coastline is beautiful all year round featuring crystal clear waters and rolling surf on hot summer days and cosy beach houses and pubs with fire places for those cold winter nights. Get there before all of the twelve apostles disappear (I think it’s down to five?)

The Kimberley

The Kimberley

Set in one of the most remote areas of Australia, The Kimberley puts some of Australia’s true natural wilderness on display. Stretched over 423 000 km and containing a population of just 40 000, this area of northern Western Australia features vast cattle stations, pristine empty beaches, unspoiled rainforests and truly iconic outback landscapes. The Kimberley is home to the famous Bungle Bungles and Broome’s beautiful coastline as well as several endangered species and one of the longest surviving cultures on Earth. Few Australian’s venture into this wilderness that just might be the most Australian location on this list. Most tourists visit The Kimberley from May to August as the land is lush from the wet season and most roads and attractions should be open.

Every Australian traveller knows about the beautiful sights our country has to offer but most of us would struggle to tick of more than one location on this list. These places are a mere sample of the beauty in our own backyard.

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